Webinar Archives

The November Meeting of the ICRC-S RTI CoP will also feature Jennifer Lockman, member of the Tennessee RTI CoP team, and Program Evaluator for Centerstone Research Institute. Jennifer will focus on using suicide prevention theory as a framework for developing evaluations, highlighting the Tennessee’s experience with their recently completed SAMHSA youth suicide prevention grant. During the meeting, each team will also have an opportunity to share challenges and successes their project has experienced. Please come prepared with updates and any questions you would like to ask the group.

Full Recording (link is external)

Power Point Slides

Date: September 26th 2014

Description: The September Meeting of the CoP will follow the concurrent session format experienced at the RTI. After a brief introductions and a welcome, participants were “placed” in breakout rooms of their choice for one of the following 30 minute presentations and Q&A sessions:

Session 1): Dr. Kimberly O’Brien of the Simmons School of Social Work, and member of the Massachusetts CoP team will provide a presentation on a study she conducted for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The study explored brief alcohol interventions for adolescent suicide attempt survivors. Notes from Session 1    PowerPoint Slides

Session 2): Dr. Phil Rodgers of LivingWorks, and Mentor to the Vermont CoP team will continue our conversation on logic models, diving more deeply into their utility and considerations for how to build one. Notes from Session 2    PowerPoint Slides

Session 3): Dr. Kate Cerulli of the University of Rochester, and Mentor to the California CoP team will present on the topic of intimate partner violence and suicide. Once the presentations are complete, participants from all three groups will come back together to share what they learned and talk about implications and next steps. Notes from Session 3 (Not Available at this Time)    PowerPoint Slides

Full Recording (link is external)- Please note, break out sessions cannot be recorded

Date: July 25th, 2014

Description: During the first session of the ICRC-S CoP, ICRC-S Staff reported on outcomes from a brief survey the CoP members completed regarding topics of interest and availability. They also reviewed the goals of the CoP, and structure moving forward. Then each of the teams provided an update regarding what actions and changes had occurred to their project since the end of the in-person RTI. Phil Rodgers from Living Works also gave an introduction to logic models.

Full Recording (link is external)

Speakers:


Stephen Russell, Ph.D., University of Arizona, Interim Director, Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences. President, Society for Research on Adolescence 


Ann Haas, Ph.D., Senior Consultant, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention


Caitlin Ryan, Ph.D., ACSW, Director, Family Acceptance Project, San Francisco State University


Moderator: Julie Ebin, Ed.M., Senior Prevention Specialist, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, EDC


Description:  

In its efforts to address behavioral health disparities, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has prioritized the goal of suicide prevention among vulnerable populations, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans. Despite strong indications of elevated risk of suicidal behavior in LGBT people, limited attention has been given to research, interventions, or suicide prevention programs targeting these populations. This webinar will offer participants up-to-date information about what is already known about LGBT suicide risk across the lifespan as well as what is being done to improve future research.  


Dr. Russell will report on the findings of an expert panel focused on the need to better understand suicidal behavior and suicide risk in sexual minority populations.  He will summarize existing research findings; he will also share recommendations for addressing knowledge gaps and applying current knowledge to relevant areas of suicide prevention practice.


Dr. Haas's presentation will focus on recent efforts to address the critical need for valid, generalizable data on the sexual orientation and gender identity of individuals who die by suicide. This will include a  brief review of how the lack of systematic data about suicide mortality among (LGBT) people significantly limits our understanding of suicide risk in these populations, and hence our ability to develop and implement appropriate and effective intervention and prevention strategies. Recently, agencies and organizations responsible for collecting and reporting on mortality data convened to address this challenge. Dr. Haas will report on the outcome of this meeting and describe the next steps in a ground-breaking effort to determine the manner and causes of suicide mortality among LGBT people. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of opportunities for participants to become involved in this work.   


Dr. Ryan will provide information about recent developments in the Family Acceptance Project, a research, intervention, education and policy project that helps ethnically and religiously diverse families to support their LGBT children in the context of their family, culture, and faith communities. This research-based family support model includes counseling strategies, assessment tools, and multicultural family education materials to help parents, foster parents, and caregivers prevent health risks, including suicide, and promote their LGBT children's well-being. 


Learning Objectives:

  • Review what is known about suicide risk among LGBT populations across the lifespan.
  • Identify gaps in research and describe how this impacts our understanding of the scope of the problem and design of prevention strategies.   
  • Describe new work to develop and test a protocol for collecting postmortem data on sexual orientation and gender identity. 
  • Explain a research-based health and mental health family support model that helps ethnically- and religiously-diverse families to support their LGBT children. 
  • Identify relevant resources available to researchers and practitioners.


Following the webinar, SPRC created a question box for you to submit questions related to the presentation. Our presenters have responded to a sample of your questions. The answers have been compiled in this document: ICRC-S & SPRC Q & A with Panelists.

LGBTQ

Dr. Kim Van Orden presented the latest research on the epidemiology and public health significance of late-life suicide. She provided an overview of risk and protective factors and models for integrating these factors. She concluded with what is known about how to intervene to prevent late-life suicide.

Kim Van Orden, PhD is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She is a clinical psychologist and her research addresses the role of social connectedness in the etiology and prevention of late-life suicide. In particular, a substantial portion of her work involves applying the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to understand the mechanisms of late-life suicide prevention. She is co-author of the book, The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide: Guidance for Working with Suicidal Clients. She is the Project Director of and Co-Investigator on a CDC-funded randomized trial of peer companionship for older adults. She is currently awarded a career development award from NIMH to study the psychosocial mechanisms whereby a behavioral intervention reduces suicide risk in older adults. Kim also maintains an active clinical practice providing cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and interpersonal psychotherapy to older adults.

Older Adults

This webinar began with a discussion about moving from "research and practice" to practical research. Dr. Lezine presented background information about the language used around suicidal behavior, the epidemiology of those behaviors in the U.S., and possible risk and protective factors. Research efforts were framed within guidance from the Prioritized Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention, and connected to related international work. The presentation also highlighted the shift from using suicide attempt survivors as research subjects to engaging them as partners in the development and implementation of new studies.
 
In addition to considering ways to move research into practice, the webinar considered ways to improve and/or promote promising practices through research and evaluation. Concepts such as help-seeking and help-giving were be proposed as prompts for community input as well as outcomes (i.e., asking the community "what would help?"). Ideas from individuals who lived through a suicidal experience were provided on topics from peer support and connectedness to hospitalization and medication. Finally, the webinar discussed the emerging emphasis on protective factors and moving from "high risk suicide prevention" to high stakes life promotion".

Youth suicide is a prevalent issue in North America, and is the third leading cause of death for all young people on the continent. The problem is even worse for rural Indigenous youth, for whom suicide is the second leading cause of mortality. Some Indigenous communities suffer from the highest youth suicide rates in the world, while others have rates far below the national average. These community-level differences suggest potentially important areas for intervention. In this webinar, presenters Birdie Trainor and Lisa Wexler described some of the challenges to approaching suicide prevention one individual at a time, particularly for Indigenous communities, and offered some alternative strategies that utilize a broader approach to prevention. The presentation identified evidence-based interventions that focus on broad-based injury prevention principles, described some promising approaches that build on community-level support systems and service-system infrastructure that are in development in one Indigenous rural region of Alaska, and shared current suicide prevention research relevant to Indigenous communities (Wexler & Gone, 2012; Wexler, 2009).

Presenters: Bridie Trainor and Lisa Wexler

A tribal member of Nome Eskimo, Bridie Trainor earned a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Bridie has worked in residential treatment centers with women, children, and teens in Alaska and New Mexico. Bridie has been Director of Kawerak Wellness since 2009. Kawerak, Inc. is a tribal non-profit representing the twenty tribes of the Bering Strait Region including people of Inupiaq, Yupik, and St. Lawrence Island Yupik descent. Lisa M. Wexler, Ph.D., MSW, is an associate professor in the Department of Public Health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her current work often utilizes participatory and digital methods to engage young people in research as co-investigators and help new projects build linkages between formal and informal systems of care and support in tribal and other marginalized communities.

American Indian and Alaska Native

Dr. John Bartkowski, Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at San Antonio and evaluator of the Mississippi Youth Suicide Prevention Project, Shatter the Silence, will discuss accomplishments and challenges related to the implementation and evaluation of Mississippi’s youth suicide prevention initiative. Although Shatter the Silence will guide much of this discussion, broader lessons pertaining to various types of youth risk prevention programs will also be addressed. Drawing on more than a decade of experience working with state agencies and community-based organizations, Dr. Bartkowski will pinpoint successful strategies for overcoming cultural barriers and resource constraints related to program implementation and evaluation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize and disseminate best practices in collaborations among state agencies, community-based organizations, and universities
  • Identify and adopt strategies for overcoming cultural barriers and resource constraints with respect to program implementation and evaluation

This webinar is designed to support the development of best practices for suicide prevention among men in the middle years of life. Bringing together panelists from the US and Ireland, this webinar will provide data on the scope of the problem, a framework for conceptualizing suicide prevention strategies, and an example of an innovative program that fits within this framework.

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the changes over time in US rates and methods for middle-aged adults with a focus on middle-aged men.
  • Identify risk and precipitating factors for suicide among middle-aged men.
  • Explain the “common risk approach” to suicide prevention.
  • Describe a pilot program implemented in Ireland for men in the middle years who are at increased risk as a result of economic/employment issues.

Sponsored by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center and the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention.

Presenter(s) 

  • Thomas Simon, PhD, Acting Associate Director for Science, Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Ella Arensman, PhD, MSc, Director of Research, National Suicide Research Foundation; Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College Cork, Ireland; and President, International Association for Suicide Prevention
  • Eric Caine, MD, John Romano Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry, and Director, Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention (ICRC-S), University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Derek McDonnell, LLM, BSc, Programme Manager, Mojo Programme, South Dublin County Partnership
Moderator 
  • Jerry Reed, PhD, MSW, EDC Vice President and Director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Injury, Violence and Suicide and of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center

View Webinar Q&A

 

One of the most challenging problems for clinicians and other professionals is dealing effectively with non-suicidal self-injury. Of special concern is that self-injury has recently moved from clinical populations such as those served in hospitals and group homes to the general population including middle, high school and college students. This presentation will focus on understanding, managing and treating diverse forms of self-injury including arm and body cutting, self-inflicted burning, excoriation of wounds, and other more serious examples. Pertinent research findings on this subject will also be discussed. Self-injury will be distinguished from suicidal behavior in terms of a number of key characteristics, but will also be discussed as a risk factor for suicide attempts. Very practical suggestions in dealing with self-injury will be provided.

About the Presenter:

Barent Walsh, Ph.D. has written extensively and presented internationally on the topic of self-destructive behavior. He is the author of Treating Self-Injury: A Practical Guide 2nd edition, Guilford Press, (2012). He is also the co-author of the book, Self-Mutilation: Theory, Research and Treatment (Guilford Press, 1988). In addition, Dr. Walsh is co-developer (with Screening for Mental Health of Wellesley, MA) of “Act to Prevent Self-Injury,” a prevention program with DVD for high schools. Dr. Walsh is the Executive Director of The Bridge, a human service agency headquartered in Worcester, MA. He oversees 45 programs including supported housing and residential treatment for children, adolescents, and adults with mental health or developmental disability challenges, and/or complex family problems. The Bridge also provides services for homeless individuals and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender youth.

About the Webinar:

This webinar will explore lessons learned from the Community Watchfulness for At-risk Youth (C-WAY) project, a research partnership between the University of Rochester Medical Center and the Spencerport, NY School District that trained school personnel and parents to identify and respond to signs of depression and suicidality. The webinar will focus on how the partnership developed and will describe key elements in the success of the partnership, as well as challenges encountered and how they were addressed. Using the example of this research partnership, the presenters will discuss what each partner brought to the table, how they formulated a research question, selected an intervention for collaborative research, and outcomes of the study. The presenters for this webinar will be Wendi Cross, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry (psychology) and the director of clinical psychology training at the University of Rochester Medical Center and an education specialist /researcher at VISN 2 VA, the Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention, in Canandaigua, NY, and David Seaburn, PhD, LMFT, former assistant professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center and former director of the Family Support Center in the Spencerport, NY Central School District.

About the Presenters: 

Wendi Cross, Ph.D. is associate professor of psychiatry (psychology) and the director of clinical psychology training at the University of Rochester Medical Center and an education specialist /researcher at VISN 2 VA, the Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention, in Canandaigua, NY. Dr. Cross is director of the Observational Research and Behavioral Information Technology Laboratory (ORBIT), which supports research involving audio-visual data. David B. Seaburn, PhD, LMFT was assistant professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) until 2005 when he became the director of the Family Support Center in the Spencerport (NY) Central School District. During his tenure, the district developed a partnership with researchers at URMC to implement Community Watchfulness for At-risk Youth (C-WAY), a research project designed to train school personnel how to identify and respond to signs of bullying, depression, and suicidality.

The Intersection of Suicide Research and Public Health Practice: Alcohol Abuse and Suicide, the first webinar in the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention’s (ICRC-S) 2014 webinar series, will take place on Wednesday, January 29th from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. A 30-minute online discussion forum will be held immediately following the webinar. The discussion forum will provide an opportunity for further dialogue with the webinar presenter and give webinar participants a chance to share additional information and resources related to the webinar topic. The webinar and discussion forum are designed for researchers and state or local practitioners in injury or suicide prevention.

The presenter for this webinar will be Kenneth Conner, PsyD, MPH, director of the VA VISN 2 Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention and associate professor of psychiatry and co-director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

The webinar will include information about:
• Acute use of alcohol (AUA) immediately prior to suicidal behavior;
• More chronic alcohol use disorder (AUD) and suicidal behavior;
• A brief summary of what is known about AUA (and AUD) and suicidal behavior; and
• A discussion of research that is needed to inform intervention efforts.

The ICRC-S’s fourth Community of Practice webinar took place on Wednesday, December 4th from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. This webinar looked at the opportunities and challenges for state health departments in sharing data with researchers, legislators, and the general public, and it will provide an introduction to working with institutional review boards (IRBs). The presenters for this webinar were Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D., director of the Susan B. Anthony Center for Women's Leadership and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization and an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester, and Debra Hodges, Ph.D., research unit director in the Alabama Department of Public Health and program evaluator for the state’s Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Prevention Grant and the Alabama Asthma Program.

See below for links to the full recorded archive and a PDF of the slides.

The ICRC-S’s fourth Community of Practice webinar will take place on Wednesday, December 4th from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. This webinar will look at the opportunities and challenges for state health departments in sharing data with researchers, legislators, and the general public, and it will provide an introduction to working with institutional review boards (IRBs). The presenters for this webinar will be Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D., director of the Susan B. Anthony Center for Women's Leadership and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization and an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester, and Debra Hodges, Ph.D., research unit director in the Alabama Department of Public Health and program evaluator for the state’s Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide Prevention Grant and the Alabama Asthma Program.

About our Speakers:

Catherine Cerulli is the director of the Susan B. Anthony Center for Women's Leadership and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization (LIVV) and an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester. Debra Hodges has worked in the field of injury prevention for six years as the research unit director in the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH).

About the Webinar

This webinar will describe efforts of the Injury Prevention Center (IPC) at Connecticut Children's Medical Center to address adolescent suicide. Current research will describe a study being conducted in the pediatric emergency department to address lethal means restriction, a statewide study of pediatricians on their attitudes and practices related to behavioral health counseling and suicide, and research that explores the intersection of children exposed to PTSD and adolescent suicide. Education and training activities will highlight efforts to engage medical students and pediatric residents in suicide prevention. Community outreach activities will describe the work of the Connecticut's Suicide Advisory Board on updating its statewide strategic plan and its successful media campaign to increase awareness about suicide prevention.

About the Presenters

Garry Lapidus, PA-C, MPH, Director, Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Assoc. Prof. Pediatrics & Public Health, Univ of Connecticut School of Medicine

Steven Rogers, MD, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician/Research Scientist, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Assist. Prof. Pediatrics, Univ of Connecticut School of Medicine

Kevin Borrup, JD, MPA Assoc. Director, Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Assist. Prof. Pediatrics, Univ of Connecticut School of Medicine

Damion Grasso, PhD Research Scientist, Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Assist. Prof. Psychiatry & Pediatrics, Univ of Connecticut School of Medicine Andrea Iger Duarte, MSW, MPH, LCSW Behavioral Health Program Manager CT Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

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