Webinar Archives

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The fourth webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Wednesday, May 18, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were Marsha Wittink from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Brooke Levandowski from the Veterans Health Administration’s Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention. Their collaborative research project explores clinician perspectives on: 1) which elements of team-based, collaborative care facilitate suicide prevention for individual patients and 2) what aspects of team-based processes might be beneficial for preventing suicide at the population level.

Suicide Prevention

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The third webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Tuesday, April 26th, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were Jo Anne Sirey, Ph.D., of Weill Cornell Medical College and Jacquelin Berman, Ph.D., of The New York City Department for the Aging. During the webinar, Drs. Sirey and Berman presented the Open Door intervention designed to improve the link to mental health care among older adults with depressive symptoms identified by aging service staff.  They discussed its implementation in New York City senior centers. Both presenters also shared the advantages and challenges of their research collaboration, as well as lessons learned. The webinar was moderated by Yeates Conwell, Co-Director of the ICRC-S and Vice Chair in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.  

Mental Health

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The second webinar in the ICRC-S's fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Friday, March 18, from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.The speakers for this webinar were members of the Tennessee team who attended the ICRC-S 2014 Research Training Institute, including Jennifer Lockman, Centerstone Research Institute and Terrence Love, Tennessee Department of Health. Additional presenters included Scott Ridgway, Director of the TSPN and Susan Gallagher, RTI faculty. Their collaborative research project focused on evaluating The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network (TSPN), a statewide network of approximately 11,000 volunteers and professionals. The TSPN is a public-private organization responsible for implementing the Tennessee Strategy for Suicide Prevention. The presentation focused on their research project (including the initial and revised aims, the qualitative and quantitative methods, IRB experience and preliminary results) as well as the collaborative process these three agencies engaged in to reach their goals. Susan Gallagher who acted as mentor to the Tennessee team for 12 months moderated the webinar.

This sixth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will focus on getting institutional buy-in for a collaborative research project.  This webinar will reach back to the 3 research projects which were presented in the September 2015 kick-off of this webinar series to hear the perspectives of the community partners in those projects.  Kathy Plum  and Melanie Funchess from the research project “Addressing Mental Health Promotion in Neighborhoods: The Natural Helpers Learning Collaborative”, Ann Marie Cook from “The Senior Connection”, and Sally J. Rousseau from “Exploring Suicide and Domestic Violence Risk Factors Across Disciplines” will all discuss their successful efforts in getting their organizations’ support for participating in the research studies, including the challenges they faced in getting institutional buy-in, the benefits to their organizations from participation in the research projects, and the lessons learned.  This webinar will be particularly useful to those who are interested in embarking on collaborative research projects and want to understand the community partner perspective.  

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The Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention (ICRC-S), a CDC-funded research center focusing on a public health approach to suicide prevention and research, launched its third annual webinar series “Exploring the Impact of Suicide Prevention Research in Multiple Settings,” on January 20, 2015. The settings which will be addressed in this year's ICRC-S webinar series include: Health Care, Schools, Faith-Based Organizations, The Justice System, The Workplace and Social Media.

On Wednesday, February 11, 2015, 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Eastern Time, the second webinar, “Exploring the Impact of Suicide Prevention Research in Health Care Settings,” took place with speakers Ursula Whiteside, PhD, clinical psychologist and suicide prevention researcher at Forefront: Innovations in Suicide Prevention, and Brian Ahmedani, PhD, LMSW, research scientist at Henry Ford Health System. Health care settings provide an important opportunity for suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention. Speakers addressed research that is being conducted in health care settings, explained the known impact the research has had, and identified needed research and practice going forward. Yeates Conwell, M.D., Professor and Vice Chair of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Department of Psychiatry, moderated this session.

This webinar is one hour and provided an opportunity for dialogue with the webinar presenters. Please follow this link to access the recording http://edc.adobeconnect.com/p73a2eul1wb/

A project of the University of Rochester Medical Center and Education Development Center, the ICRC-S draws suicide prevention directly into the domain of public health and injury prevention and links it to complementary approaches to mental health. 

Ursula Whiteside, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in the field of treatment for suicidal individuals. She is currently a research scientist with Forefront: Innovations in Suicide Prevention, working on grants from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Institute of Mental Health.

Brian Ahmedani, PhD, LMSW, is a research scientist at Henry Ford Health System with appointments in the Center for Health Policy and Health Services Research and the Department of Psychiatry. As a researcher, his main interests have centered around mental health/substance use services, with a special focus on suicide prevention. 

Yeates Conwell, MD is professor and vice chair of the University of Rochester (UR) School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, where he also directs the Geriatric Psychiatry Program. He is co-director of the UR Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide and director of the University’s Office for Aging Research and Health Services. Dr. Conwell has lectured and written extensively on suicide and depression in later life, drawing on research that has been continuously funded by NIH, the CDC, and foundation support for the past 25 years. 

Best Practices

The fifth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S’s 2015-2016 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will provide insights on “Preparing to Submit an Application for IRB Review.”  Bretta Jacquemin, Research Scientist at the Center for Health Statistics and Informatics at the New Jersey Department of Health, will give a brief overview of the federal regulations regarding the protection of human subjects, highlighting the definitions of “research” and “human subject” and explaining how local practices may be more expansive than federal guidelines.  She will also discuss the components of a complete IRB application, the different types of IRB review, and how an application is read by a reviewer.  She will then provide some examples of studies and the logic used in the review of those studies. Dr. Bryann DeBeer, a participant in the ICRC-S’s 2014 Research Training Institute (RTI), will discuss her experiences in submitting research projects for IRB review. In particular, she will outline considerations for gaining IRB approval for RTI projects, including the timeline of project submission, tips for completing the IRB application, anticipation of challenges and strategies for overcoming challenges, and special considerations for suicide prevention research.

View a PDF of the slides

Watch the recording

ICRC-S Webinar Series to Start in January 2016: 
Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works?

The fourth annual webinar series conducted by the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention (ICRC-S), a CDC-funded research center focusing on a public health approach to suicide prevention and research, began on Tuesday, January 12, 2016. A project of the University of Rochester Medical Center and Education Development Center, the ICRC-S draws suicide prevention directly into the domain of public health and injury prevention and links it to complementary approaches to mental health.

To prevent suicide, researchers need community and partner input in all phases of research to enable the development and dissemination of evidence-based and culturally competent interventions. This year's webinar series will explore the important factors that influence collaboration and will share real world experiences from collaborative research projects, including successes and challenges.

Each monthly webinar will be one hour and will provide an opportunity for dialogue with the webinar presenters.

Understanding Adolescent Suicide Attempts: A Research Collaboration among the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Simmons School of Social Work, and Boston Children’s Hospital 

Understanding Adolescent Suicide Attempts: A Research Collaboration among the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Simmons School of Social Work, and Boston Children’s Hospital

The first of six webinars in the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention's (ICRC-S) 2016 webinar series took place on Tuesday, January 12th from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were members of the Massachusetts team that attended the ICRC-S 2014 Research Training Institute, including Dr. Kimberly O'Brien and Dr. Joanna Almeida, Assistant Professors, Simmons School of Social Work (Boston), and Brandy Brooks of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Suicide Prevention Program. Their collaborative research project focused on understanding the preparatory thoughts, behaviors, and decision-making processes that precipitate adolescent suicide attempts. David B. Goldston, Ph.D., Duke Child and Family Study Center Practice, Duke University, moderated the webinar. Dr. Goldston acted as mentor to the Massachusetts team for 12 months. 

 
Research Methods

Friday, December 18, 2015 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EASTERN TIME

This fourth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S’s 2015-2016 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will focus on “Forming a Collaborative Research Team.”  This webinar will highlight the experiences of Dr. Susan Keys in building a collaborative relationship and research agenda to address high rates of suicide in Central Oregon. She will identify factors to consider when pairing academic research interests with a community's need to solve problems.  Additionally, she will discuss the implications of cultural context when developing and implementing a suicide prevention initiative and how this relates to a current research project focused on firearm safety, suicide prevention, and primary care.  Dr. Yeates Conwell will add his perspective on the different “levels” of community-based research and place partnership development between academic and community stakeholders into a theoretical context. He will use the ongoing work of the Rochester area’s Senior Health and Research Alliance to illustrate partnership development processes.   

This Community of Practice webinar is designed to lay a foundation for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

PDF of slides

Unfortunately, due to technical issues, the webinar recording will not be available for this webinar.

Developing a Research Question, Aim, and Plan

This third Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series will focus on “Developing a (Fundable) Research Question, Aim and Plan.” Learn about resources and strategies that you can use to create a fundable proposal for suicide prevention research collaborations. You’ll also hear what funders are looking for in a proposal, some common pitfalls researchers should avoid, and how you can take your passions and interests and turn them into science.  You will also hear from one experienced researcher as she shares her practical experience related to this topic.  This CoP is designed to continue to lay a foundation for the remaining sessions and for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

Speakers:

Jane Pearson, Ph.D., chairs the National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Suicide Research Consortium. She is the Associate Director for Preventive Interventions in the Division of Services and Intervention Research, and she is currently leading the staffing for the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force.

Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Cerulli is the Director of the Susan B. Anthony Center and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization.

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PDF of slides

Title: You Know a Tree by Its Fruit: Collaborative Research Projects in Suicide Prevention

This second community of practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series will focus on initiating and developing suicide prevention research collaborations. Get ready and stay ready for successful research partnerships by reviewing purposes, principles and practices – topics that lay a foundation for remaining CoP sessions and for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

Speaker:

Ann Marie White, EdD is Director of the Office of Mental Health Promotion (OMHP) and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She leads department-level change initiatives to deepen Psychiatry's community engagement via service, education and research. OMHP oversees community, consumer and diversity affairs for Psychiatry faculty and staff. Dr. White directs local and national training activities in collaborative research to infuse scientific inquiries with mental health-related policy and program activities of communities. She promotes mental health supporting behaviors, services utilization and mental illness prevention strategies within community-based settings. She conducts multimedia education to develop civic engagement among youth and young adults from traditionally disadvantaged backgrounds. Her research interests focus on successful transitions into adulthood.

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View the slides

Date: September 18th, 2015 2:00pm ET (1pm CT, 12pm MT, 11am PT)

Description: During the first meeting of the Planning a Collaborative Research Project Community of Practice (CoP), participants will learn about the goals and expectations for the CoP, be introduced to the case studies the CoP will explore, learn more about the 2016 RTI and receive the call for applications.

Full Recording

PDF of slides

RTI Call For Application and Response Form

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On Friday, August 14, 2015, ICRC-S hosted "Exploring the Impact of Suicide Prevention Research in Social Media," with speakers Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, M.D., Ph.D., M.M.Sc. and Benedikt Till, D.Sc. Recent developments in the field of media and suicide research reflect a change in focus from traditional to online media and an increasing attention to stories of hope and recovery and their potential to help prevent suicide. In this webinar, the presenters focused on their recent research investigating how stories of recovery delivered via newspaper reports and fictional films impact various audiences. Furthermore, they presented findings on the role of the Internet in conveying information about suicide and suicide prevention in the United States and in Europe.

About Our Presenters

Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, M.D., Ph.D., M.M.Sc. is Associate Professor and Head of the Suicide Research Unit of the Institute of Social Medicine, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. He is co-chair of the IASP Media & Suicide Task Force, Co-chair of National Representatives to IASP, and the founding chairman of the interdisciplinary Austrian science platform Wiener Werkstaette for Suicide Research. In this role, he was awarded with the Erwin Ringel Award (Austrian Society for Suicide Prevention) and Hans Rost Award (German Association for Suicide Prevention) for the description of a suicide-protective Papageno effect of media portayals of coping with adverse circumstances. Dr. Niederkrotenthaler is principal investigator in several projects related to media and suicide and has so far written 65 scientific and educational publications in the area of suicide prevention. He is also an independent contractor in the U.S. Lifeline Crisis chat evaluation. From 2011 to 2012, Dr. Niederkrotenthaler worked as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer at the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta. In addition, he served as a discussant of Aspirational Goal Number 10 Increasing help-seeking and referrals for at-risk individuals by decreasing stigma in the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's Research Prioritization Task Force.

Benedikt Till, D.Sc. is an Assistant Professor in the Suicide Research Unit, Institute of Social Medicine, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. He has a doctoral degree in psychology (major: media psychology) and is experienced in quantitative and qualitative research methods. He is also a founding member of the Wiener Werkstaette for Suicide Research, the Austrian platform for interdisciplinary suicide research and prevention. Dr. Till works in the field of media psychology, health communication and suicide research. He has conducted several investigations in the topic area of media and suicide and is author of numerous publications on the role of the mass media in suicidality and suicidal behavior. In 2011, he was the winner of the Star Award of the International Academy of Suicide Research for the best research paper published on suicide by a young researcher. Dr. Till is currently involved in a three-year project investigating the representations and effects of suicide-related websites on Internet users.

The final call for this community of practice was an opportunity for all teams, mentors, staff and faculty to debrief about their experience and lessons learned from the RTI, CoP, and mentor. After a review of the past RTI and CoP, the discussion centered around the following questions:

• What is the most memorable part of the Research Training Institute and Community of Practice?

• What (if anything) would you do differently if you could do it all again?

• How has the RTI, CoP, and relationship with the mentor affected your work?

• How do we move forward from here?

Full Recording (link is external)

On Wednesday, July 15, 2015, 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time ICRC-S presented “Exploring the Impact of Suicide Prevention Research in Criminal Justice Systems,” with speakers Dr. Marc Swogger of the University of Rochester and Dr. Robert Canning of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Incarceration has been identified as a risk factor for suicide and studies have shown that suicide is significantly higher among people that have had contact with the criminal justice system, even if they were never convicted or served time. In this webinar, Dr. Swogger spoke about psychopathy in relation to substance use treatment, violenceoverall psychopathology, and suicidality in forensic populations. Dr. Canning moderated the webinar and discussed issues of conducting research in prisons.     

Corrections

Date: May 29th, 2015

Title: Updates & Suicide Prevention Programs in Correctional Settings

Description: The ICRC-S RTI CoP teams each had the opportunity to share 3 minutes worth of updates, then discuss and ask questions about one another’s work. Then, Dr. Robert Canning provided a presentation on Suicide Prevention Programs in Correctional Settings. Designing and implementing suicide prevention programs in correctional settings presents unique challenges to public health practitioners and clinicians. Although one might imagine that having a “captive” audience would make public health campaigns simpler, but suicide prevention in the correctional environment is not as “simple” as infectious disease prevention. Jail and prison administrators (as well as other stakeholders) need education about suicide as a preventable death. Inmates are often thought of as a deviant population, and the stigma of mental illness and suicide is an important consideration. Traditional methods of reaching a population at risk using educational materials and information campaigns may not be possible in a correctional environment. I’ll present the epidemiology of suicide in jails and prison and we can discuss best practices for suicide prevention in correctional settings.

About the Speaker: Dr. Robert Canning completed his PhD in Clinical Psychology in 1993. After clinical training he completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Psychiatric Epidemiology working with a longitudinal study of heart transplant recipients and their caregivers. He has worked as a clinician in the VA system and at the UC Davis Medical Center where he worked with liver transplant patients. Since 2001 he has been with the California Dept. of Corrections & Rehabilitation, initially treating HIV-positive inmates and since 2005 being the department’s suicide prevention coordinator. He has had primary responsibility for collection and analysis of suicide and self-harm data for the department as well as designing and delivering suicide risk assessment training to hundreds of correctional clinicians. He has also been a trainer for the American Association of Suicidology delivering the Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk course for clinicians since 2007.

Full Recording (link is external)

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