Webinar Archives

This webinar focused on the use of student-generated social media data to detect and monitor behavior patterns predictive of risk for suicide and self-injury. The Durkheim Project Application (DPA) is an existing digital technology, originally designed to apply machine learning algorithms to social media data to improve identification of risk for suicide in veterans. The presenters, Molly Adrian and Aaron Lyon, discussed their research into applying the DPA as a universal suicide prevention strategy to a general high school population in order to examine the extent to which student-generated social media data provide the information needed to accurately predict and reduce suicide risk compared to more traditional paper-and-pencil screening approaches.

While the use of communication strategies is becoming increasingly popular in public health approaches to suicide prevention, few efforts regularly adopt recommended practices associated with successful messaging including the use of data to drive campaign activities. In this webinar, Dr. Karras provided guidance in this area by discussing empirical methods to inform the development and evaluation of suicide prevention messaging, and presented examples of those utilized by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to assess outcomes associated with VA sponsored campaigns. She concluded her presentation with discussion of and recommendations for a framework for the effective use of suicide prevention communications.

Sleep disturbance has been identified as a risk factor associated with suicidal thought and behavior and may represent a low stigma presenting problem for initiating psychotherapy. Dr. Bishop briefly reviewed the literature regarding relationships among sleep disturbance and suicidal thought and behavior and discussed ongoing work in the development of interventions to simultaneously address sleep, depression, and suicide, and the importance of this work to the Veteran community.

This Community of Practice (CoP) webinar took place on Thursday, August 11, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time and addressed two topics of interest to many early career researchers – career development and disseminating your research results. Eric Caine, MD and Yeates Conwell, MD, both Co-Directors of the ICRC-S, were the featured presenters.

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The final webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place Wednesday, July 13, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.  Speakers from Vermont and Kentucky shared their experiences in identifying, obtaining, and analyzing suicide surveillance data to make advances in suicide prevention.  Bonnie Lipton, Prevention Specialist for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, acted as Moderator. 

Inspired by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Suicide Care in Systems Framework, Kentucky’s Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) program and Department for Behavioral Health, Development, and Intellectual Disabilities (DBHDID) looked at data as a first step in enhancing the ability of Kentucky’s state psychiatric hospitals and community mental health centers (CMHCs) to prevent suicide. Jan Ulrich of the DBHDID shared lessons learned and next steps in improving Kentucky’s systems of care toward preventing suicide.

In 2014, Vermont’s Service Members, Veterans and Their Families Workgroup, which was convened by the governor and includes high-level leadership from state agencies, initiated a request to gather information on suicides among veterans. As part of the response, members of the Vermont Suicide Prevention Data Group (Data Group) conducted an analysis of suicides, both among veterans and among Vermont residents who had received services from state-funded mental health and substance abuse agencies. Tom Delaney of the University of Vermont College of Medicine shared the experience of working with the Data Group, which found that these data indicated that expanding the current GLS funding to include suicide prevention across the lifespan was warranted and made a case for such expansion to key constituents.  

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The fifth webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Wednesday, June 1, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.  The speakers for this webinar were Camille Quinn of The Ohio State University, Kathleen Kemp of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, and Kevin Richard, Deputy Administrator for Rhode Island Family Court. Dr. Quinn provided background information on what is known and not known about juvenile justice involved/incarcerated youth and suicide and moderated the webinar.  Dr. Kemp and Mr. Richard shared their experience implementing an evidence-based mental health and substance use screening protocol (which included suicide ideation) in the family court with diverted youth. In addition, the speakers addressed their plans to implement a brief intervention provided by front-line juvenile court staff for youth who screen positive for suicide ideation as well as plans to pursue the ability to share records across health care and court records. The presenters also spoke to the challenges and successes of their collaboration.  

Corrections

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The fourth webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Wednesday, May 18, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were Marsha Wittink from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Brooke Levandowski from the Veterans Health Administration’s Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention. Their collaborative research project explores clinician perspectives on: 1) which elements of team-based, collaborative care facilitate suicide prevention for individual patients and 2) what aspects of team-based processes might be beneficial for preventing suicide at the population level. 

Suicide Prevention, Veterans

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The third webinar in the ICRC-S’s fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Tuesday, April 26th, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were Jo Anne Sirey, Ph.D., of Weill Cornell Medical College and Jacquelin Berman, Ph.D., of The New York City Department for the Aging. During the webinar, Drs. Sirey and Berman presented the Open Door intervention designed to improve the link to mental health care among older adults with depressive symptoms identified by aging service staff.  They discussed its implementation in New York City senior centers. Both presenters also shared the advantages and challenges of their research collaboration, as well as lessons learned. The webinar was moderated by Yeates Conwell, Co-Director of the ICRC-S and Vice Chair in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.  

Mental Health, Older Adults

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The second webinar in the ICRC-S's fourth annual webinar series, Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works, took place on Friday, March 18, from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time.The speakers for this webinar were members of the Tennessee team who attended the ICRC-S 2014 Research Training Institute, including Jennifer Lockman, Centerstone Research Institute and Terrence Love, Tennessee Department of Health. Additional presenters included Scott Ridgway, Director of the TSPN and Susan Gallagher, RTI faculty. Their collaborative research project focused on evaluating The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network (TSPN), a statewide network of approximately 11,000 volunteers and professionals. The TSPN is a public-private organization responsible for implementing the Tennessee Strategy for Suicide Prevention. The presentation focused on their research project (including the initial and revised aims, the qualitative and quantitative methods, IRB experience and preliminary results) as well as the collaborative process these three agencies engaged in to reach their goals. Susan Gallagher who acted as mentor to the Tennessee team for 12 months moderated the webinar.

This sixth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will focus on getting institutional buy-in for a collaborative research project.  This webinar will reach back to the 3 research projects which were presented in the September 2015 kick-off of this webinar series to hear the perspectives of the community partners in those projects.  Kathy Plum  and Melanie Funchess from the research project “Addressing Mental Health Promotion in Neighborhoods: The Natural Helpers Learning Collaborative”, Ann Marie Cook from “The Senior Connection”, and Sally J. Rousseau from “Exploring Suicide and Domestic Violence Risk Factors Across Disciplines” will all discuss their successful efforts in getting their organizations’ support for participating in the research studies, including the challenges they faced in getting institutional buy-in, the benefits to their organizations from participation in the research projects, and the lessons learned.  This webinar will be particularly useful to those who are interested in embarking on collaborative research projects and want to understand the community partner perspective.  

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The fifth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S’s 2015-2016 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will provide insights on “Preparing to Submit an Application for IRB Review.”  Bretta Jacquemin, Research Scientist at the Center for Health Statistics and Informatics at the New Jersey Department of Health, will give a brief overview of the federal regulations regarding the protection of human subjects, highlighting the definitions of “research” and “human subject” and explaining how local practices may be more expansive than federal guidelines.  She will also discuss the components of a complete IRB application, the different types of IRB review, and how an application is read by a reviewer.  She will then provide some examples of studies and the logic used in the review of those studies. Dr. Bryann DeBeer, a participant in the ICRC-S’s 2014 Research Training Institute (RTI), will discuss her experiences in submitting research projects for IRB review. In particular, she will outline considerations for gaining IRB approval for RTI projects, including the timeline of project submission, tips for completing the IRB application, anticipation of challenges and strategies for overcoming challenges, and special considerations for suicide prevention research.

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ICRC-S Webinar Series to Start in January 2016: 
Successful Collaborative Research for Suicide Prevention: What Works?

The fourth annual webinar series conducted by the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention (ICRC-S), a CDC-funded research center focusing on a public health approach to suicide prevention and research, began on Tuesday, January 12, 2016. A project of the University of Rochester Medical Center and Education Development Center, the ICRC-S draws suicide prevention directly into the domain of public health and injury prevention and links it to complementary approaches to mental health.

To prevent suicide, researchers need community and partner input in all phases of research to enable the development and dissemination of evidence-based and culturally competent interventions. This year's webinar series will explore the important factors that influence collaboration and will share real world experiences from collaborative research projects, including successes and challenges.

Each monthly webinar will be one hour and will provide an opportunity for dialogue with the webinar presenters.

Understanding Adolescent Suicide Attempts: A Research Collaboration among the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Simmons School of Social Work, and Boston Children’s Hospital 

Understanding Adolescent Suicide Attempts: A Research Collaboration among the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Simmons School of Social Work, and Boston Children’s Hospital

The first of six webinars in the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention's (ICRC-S) 2016 webinar series took place on Tuesday, January 12th from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The speakers for this webinar were members of the Massachusetts team that attended the ICRC-S 2014 Research Training Institute, including Dr. Kimberly O'Brien and Dr. Joanna Almeida, Assistant Professors, Simmons School of Social Work (Boston), and Brandy Brooks of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Suicide Prevention Program. Their collaborative research project focused on understanding the preparatory thoughts, behaviors, and decision-making processes that precipitate adolescent suicide attempts. David B. Goldston, Ph.D., Duke Child and Family Study Center Practice, Duke University, moderated the webinar. Dr. Goldston acted as mentor to the Massachusetts team for 12 months. 

 
Research Methods

Friday, December 18, 2015 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EASTERN TIME

This fourth Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S’s 2015-2016 series, Planning a Collaborative Research Project, will focus on “Forming a Collaborative Research Team.”  This webinar will highlight the experiences of Dr. Susan Keys in building a collaborative relationship and research agenda to address high rates of suicide in Central Oregon. She will identify factors to consider when pairing academic research interests with a community's need to solve problems.  Additionally, she will discuss the implications of cultural context when developing and implementing a suicide prevention initiative and how this relates to a current research project focused on firearm safety, suicide prevention, and primary care.  Dr. Yeates Conwell will add his perspective on the different “levels” of community-based research and place partnership development between academic and community stakeholders into a theoretical context. He will use the ongoing work of the Rochester area’s Senior Health and Research Alliance to illustrate partnership development processes.   

This Community of Practice webinar is designed to lay a foundation for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

PDF of slides

Unfortunately, due to technical issues, the webinar recording will not be available for this webinar.

Developing a Research Question, Aim, and Plan

This third Community of Practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series will focus on “Developing a (Fundable) Research Question, Aim and Plan.” Learn about resources and strategies that you can use to create a fundable proposal for suicide prevention research collaborations. You’ll also hear what funders are looking for in a proposal, some common pitfalls researchers should avoid, and how you can take your passions and interests and turn them into science.  You will also hear from one experienced researcher as she shares her practical experience related to this topic.  This CoP is designed to continue to lay a foundation for the remaining sessions and for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

Speakers:

Jane Pearson, Ph.D., chairs the National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Suicide Research Consortium. She is the Associate Director for Preventive Interventions in the Division of Services and Intervention Research, and she is currently leading the staffing for the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force.

Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Cerulli is the Director of the Susan B. Anthony Center and the Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization.

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Title: You Know a Tree by Its Fruit: Collaborative Research Projects in Suicide Prevention

This second community of practice (CoP) session in the ICRC-S 2015-16 series will focus on initiating and developing suicide prevention research collaborations. Get ready and stay ready for successful research partnerships by reviewing purposes, principles and practices – topics that lay a foundation for remaining CoP sessions and for your upcoming application to the ICRC-S’s 2016 Research Training Institute.

Speaker:

Ann Marie White, EdD is Director of the Office of Mental Health Promotion (OMHP) and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She leads department-level change initiatives to deepen Psychiatry's community engagement via service, education and research. OMHP oversees community, consumer and diversity affairs for Psychiatry faculty and staff. Dr. White directs local and national training activities in collaborative research to infuse scientific inquiries with mental health-related policy and program activities of communities. She promotes mental health supporting behaviors, services utilization and mental illness prevention strategies within community-based settings. She conducts multimedia education to develop civic engagement among youth and young adults from traditionally disadvantaged backgrounds. Her research interests focus on successful transitions into adulthood.

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Date: September 18th, 2015 2:00pm ET (1pm CT, 12pm MT, 11am PT)

Description: During the first meeting of the Planning a Collaborative Research Project Community of Practice (CoP), participants will learn about the goals and expectations for the CoP, be introduced to the case studies the CoP will explore, learn more about the 2016 RTI and receive the call for applications.

Full Recording

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RTI Call For Application and Response Form

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